Farmington (248) 477-3301
Berkley (248) 545-0100



Blog

Tuesday, 29 May 2018 00:00

What is Soft Running?

Running is a great way to stay in shape, and you can try to limit the amount of injuries you endure by running “softer”. A recent study looked at “320 novice runners and measured their landing force at two paces – a slower 12-minute-per-mile pace and a quicker 8-minute-per-mile pace”. Those leading the study had half of the participants learn to run “softer” while others made no changes in their styles of running. According to the study, “After 12 months, researchers found that the runners who learned to run ‘softer’ had 62 percent less injuries than the runners who made no changes.” If you are a runner and you want to fix your stride to reduce your chance of injury, you should try counting your foot strikes per minute. Another tip is to inspect your shoes to find the areas that are worn out. The worn out areas will tell you where your feet are landing when you run. If you have shin pain or heel pain, this may suggest that you are either over striding or using the wrong muscles.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. David Ungar of Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training Into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Prevent Running Injuries
Monday, 21 May 2018 00:00

What is a Plantar Wart?

If you experience a growth of bottom of your foot, you may have what is referred to as a plantar wart. Generally, warts will grow upwards from the skin, but a plantar wart will grow into the sole of the foot because of pressure on the foot from walking and standing. One of the first symptoms that may be noticed can be severe pain and discomfort, and will worsen over time if not treated properly. It is typically caused by the human papillomavirus and can enter the skin through small cuts that may be present on the sole of the foot. This is considered to be a contagious condition and appropriate shoes are suggested to be worn in public showers, pools and surrounding areas. Seeking the advice of a podiatrist is advised for proper treatment or removal techniques if you are affected by this uncomfortable and often very painful condition.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. David Ungar from Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts
Monday, 14 May 2018 00:00

How Yoga can Help Strengthen the Feet

Stretching the feet not only feels good, but it will benefit the entire body. The feet are considered to be the foundation of the body, and research has indicated the muscles, tendons and ligaments become stronger when proper stretching techniques are performed. Implementing a yoga practice into your daily routine, which generally incorporates foot stretches, will aid in strengthening the ankles and toes. When the feet feel strong, proper alignment in the body will become attainable, which could allow daily activities to become more manageable. Correct foot stretches may also aid in the prevention of medical conditions including bunions and heel pain, which may typically be referred to as plantar fasciitis. An effective stretch is referred to as a towel stretch, and this involves putting a towel underneath your foot. At this point, moving the toes to grab pieces of the towel will aid strengthening the arch and the toes. Pointing and flexing the toes is a popular stretch of the entire foot, and it’s relatively simple to perform.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. David Ungar from Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stretching Your Feet
Monday, 07 May 2018 00:00

How to Treat a Bunion

Bunions are typically the result of a bone deformity that affects the toes. The big toe typically leans toward the second toe, and this may cause a bump to form on the bottom of the big toe. Fluid may develop in the surrounding joint, in addition to the skin becoming thickened. This is often a painful condition, and as a result other ailments such as arthritis may develop. Research has shown that it’s beneficial to wear proper shoes that can accommodate the bunion and possibly diminish the pain and discomfort. Relief options may include using adequate padding over the bunion for protection, and wearing shoes that can adjust to the width of your foot. For bunions that have become extremely painful and unmanageable, surgery may be an option to consider. It’s suggested to schedule a consultation with a podiatrist to learn about the best treatment options for you.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. David Ungar of Personal Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Connect with us