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Monday, 18 March 2019 00:00

Many people find it beneficial to practice daily foot stretches. Injuries may be prevented when the feet are flexible, and everyday activities may be easier to accomplish. An effective stretch is referred to as the towel stretch. This is done by sitting down and wrapping a towel around your feet and pulling gently toward you. If you are afflicted with plantar fasciitis, it may be helpful to stand on a step, and place your heels off the edge. The stretch can be felt while the heels move up and down. The sole of the foot can be stretched by standing on a golf or tennis ball and rolling it between the toes and the heels. This may help tired feet to feel better at the end of the day. If you would like additional information about the benefits of stretching the feet, please speak to a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. David Ungar  from Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 11 March 2019 00:00

Research has indicated that approximately twenty-five percent of diabetic patients may develop a foot ulcer. This wound can easily become infected, and may be prevented if proper care is administered. This may include removing the infected tissue from the wound which may be helpful in initiating proper healing. If an infection develops, it is necessary to start treatment which may include specific antibiotics. To keep the infection from getting worse, it is important to cover the wound with dressings that are used to treat diabetic wounds. This may allow for proper drainage, and may also provide an adequate moisture environment for the wound. It may be beneficial for many patients to stay off the foot during the healing process. If you are afflicted with a foot ulcer, it is strongly recommended to seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. David Ungar from Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a nondiabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 04 March 2019 00:00

The pain and discomfort that is typically associated with Morton’s neuroma is located on the ball of the foot. Many patients may notice swelling and feel a burning sensation in that area of the foot, and it may affect the way you walk. It generally occurs as a result of a thickened nerve that leads to the toes. This may happen from wearing shoes that are too tight and may cause the affected nerve to become irritated. There may be other causes of Morton’s neuroma, and these may include having flat feet, or medical conditions such as hammer toes or bunions. It is important to have a proper diagnosis performed. This can be accomplished by having an X-ray taken, which may be helpful in eliminating other conditions that may exist. If you feel you have this condition, it is advised to consult with a podiatrist who can suggest wearing insoles or recommend foot strengthening exercises.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. David Ungar of Personal Foot Care. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 25 February 2019 00:00

Ingrown toenails are uncomfortable and can sometimes make it painful to walk. Common causes for this condition include ill-fitting shoes, injury, excessively sweaty feet, and thick or curved nails. Once they have started to form, ingrown toenails can go through three stages. Stage 1 begins with the initial inflammation and is followed by moderate pain, swelling, redness, and visible fluid accumulation. Stage 2 occurs if the symptoms begin to worsen. Signs that the nail is entering stage 2 are increased pain and pus discharge from the wound. Stage 3 is the most severe form of an ingrown toenail and requires medical attention in order to be treated. In stage 3, new tissue can form over the wound, which can easily intensify the infection. It’s important to begin treating an ingrown toenail as soon as you notice any symptoms, so you can avoid progression into stage 3. If you have an ingrown toenail, it is recommended you consult with a podiatrist to learn about treatment options.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. David Ungar of Personal Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Farmington and Berkley, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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